A New Challenge

I'm taking some valuable classes this fall. #1 - The Business of Art #2 - Art Law #3 - Photography #4 - Independent Study (Sculpture) I like a challenge. In many cases that comes with anxiety but more often than not, I have hope. Hope that I'll learn something, that I'll get excited about a … Continue reading A New Challenge

Building Skills in Museum Education through Online Courses

As usual, Lindsey has posted very helpful information.

Looking Back, Moving Forward in Museum Education!

February 6, 2020

One of the ways all professionals, especially museum education professionals, should take advantage of professional development opportunities is taking courses that will develop skills we use in our professions. Sometimes it is more convenient to take online courses that allow museum professionals to schedule their coursework around their available time. Online courses provide opportunities to connect with other individuals when one is not able to get that experience in a regular course. There are many options to explore for online courses especially for museum education courses.

The most recent example of options I came across is from MuseumDev, which offers 4-week courses for museum professionals taught by subject experts with specialized skills and practical experience. MuseumDev courses are offered to those who are currently employed in a museum and want to broaden their skill set, on the job market for museum positions and want to gain a…

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Sun Made Copies of Awesomeness (again)

2020 UPDATE.(Scroll down further in the post to see the art lesson ideas.) Since posting this lesson, I took a history of photography course.  I feel a few changes and addendums are needed. It's still a great lesson - but there's more to it than an activity and some peripheral artists. There's science here! The … Continue reading Sun Made Copies of Awesomeness (again)

I was asked to write about “tradition” in art – then this happened.

Featured Artwork: Mother Embrace by Kate Ahn. Available for purchase on Minted.com The importance of “tradition” in art. An outdated model. In reference to art, I believe “tradition” often acts as a stand in for “mythology” or “religion”. Art is often used to gauge the values of the era in which it was created. “Tradition” … Continue reading I was asked to write about “tradition” in art – then this happened.

Mary March

I’ve been researching artists who aren’t from another century – I came across Mary Corey March. She’s visible on instagram, twitter, has a website and a blog where you can explore her work.

First – it’s jarring to find artists so close to my age who have done bodies of work that span decades… I’m knocked out of my frustration at coming to art late in life – I need a little shake up to remind me why I’m back in school getting a degree that no one understands. (what are you going to do with an art degree? can you make money doing that? how much will that pay?) Does no one understand that anyone who pursues art pretty much expects to be poor and subjected to constant criticism?
Damn, artists are serious badasses – I stand ready for your bullets of doubt and judgement – and then I do amazing, beautiful, imaginitive things that feed my passion and make me insanely happy. Try cashing that paycheck and go pooh-pooh someone else’s dreams.

Mary Corey March works with textiles and likes to make participants our of spectators. I connect with that – I’m going to school for this art degree because I want people to relate to art, to experience it and find that they have more facets than they thought.

2 Op Collective

2 Op Collective has their eyes on Mary March! Here are some examples of her work:

Q. Tell us about your work?

A. I work in many mediums and styles, but this is my favorite piece so far.  Identity Tapestry is a Participatory Installation.  Each participant selects a color of yarn (out of 300 some uniquely dyed skeins) to represent them.  They then wrap the yarn around the identity statements they feel are part of their identity.  Some of these are simple “I am a woman”, “music moves me” and some more hard-hitting “I have fought in a war”, “I have seen a someone dying”, and even “I have been raped”.  As more and more people overlay the strands of their lives the interconnections and common human experiences become visible, forming a Tapestry of human identity.

I tried to get the whole spectrum of human experience there, taking the…

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Day at the Museum: Field Trips for Kids and Museum Educators

I’ve asked my kids what they remember about visiting art museums. Mostly it was impressions of the reverence they had to have for the institution. Then there were natural history museums – it the impressive scale of ancient things and as for children’s museums, they remember the fun they were able to have interacting – huge chess sets, wind tunnels, water and manipulative objects.
Wouldn’t it be great to mix it all up?
My thoughts tend to drift toward how museums educators can make everything more inclusive for special needs children. My experience is with bringing art into the classroom and teaching about the masters at the primary education level – the best times were had with children who had special needs. Specifically developmental or cognitive disorders. These are children who are often being taught to assimilate instead of meet the world on their terms – it was thrilling to let them find that expression through art was something they could make their own.

Thank you Lindsey for this great post.

Looking Back, Moving Forward in Museum Education!

Added to Medium, July 27, 2017

Before we know it, it will be time for kids to return to school. The highlight of the majority of the students’ school year is the field trip or two. Both kids and museum educators look forward to these field trips for different reasons. Kids enjoy time away from the classroom to play and to, ultimately, learn. Museum educators look forward to interacting with the students to show them ways to bring the material they learn to life, and to assist teachers in teaching the material the students learn in the classroom. To successfully fulfil our institutions’ missions as well as our schools’ expectations, we learn about what the teachers’ standards are for in the classroom they make sure to follow to help their students fulfil the requirements. By seeing how field trips effect kids and museum educators, we can understand how field trips…

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Reflections on Museum Education Since COVID Arrived in the United States Part 1 — Looking Back, Moving Forward in Museum Education!

Another great article from Lindsey Steward Goldberg. August 20, 2020 It has been at least six months since the United States was on lockdown due to the pandemic, and there has been a lot of changes that have occurred especially within the museum field. Usually I would write a reflection about the museum field in … Continue reading Reflections on Museum Education Since COVID Arrived in the United States Part 1 — Looking Back, Moving Forward in Museum Education!

Want to Save the Humanities? Bring out the Skulls — Cheers!

The Covid-19 crisis is a chicken with its head off, bounding its crazy path to who knows where. For now, the experts aren’t willing to venture predictions about very much, including how long the disease will rage, what its mortality profile will turn out to be, whether warmer temperatures will stop it in its tracks, … Continue reading Want to Save the Humanities? Bring out the Skulls — Cheers!