Mary March

I’ve been researching artists who aren’t from another century – I came across Mary Corey March. She’s visible on instagram, twitter, has a website and a blog where you can explore her work.

First – it’s jarring to find artists so close to my age who have done bodies of work that span decades… I’m knocked out of my frustration at coming to art late in life – I need a little shake up to remind me why I’m back in school getting a degree that no one understands. (what are you going to do with an art degree? can you make money doing that? how much will that pay?) Does no one understand that anyone who pursues art pretty much expects to be poor and subjected to constant criticism?
Damn, artists are serious badasses – I stand ready for your bullets of doubt and judgement – and then I do amazing, beautiful, imaginitive things that feed my passion and make me insanely happy. Try cashing that paycheck and go pooh-pooh someone else’s dreams.

Mary Corey March works with textiles and likes to make participants our of spectators. I connect with that – I’m going to school for this art degree because I want people to relate to art, to experience it and find that they have more facets than they thought.

2 Op Collective

2 Op Collective has their eyes on Mary March! Here are some examples of her work:

Q. Tell us about your work?

A. I work in many mediums and styles, but this is my favorite piece so far.  Identity Tapestry is a Participatory Installation.  Each participant selects a color of yarn (out of 300 some uniquely dyed skeins) to represent them.  They then wrap the yarn around the identity statements they feel are part of their identity.  Some of these are simple “I am a woman”, “music moves me” and some more hard-hitting “I have fought in a war”, “I have seen a someone dying”, and even “I have been raped”.  As more and more people overlay the strands of their lives the interconnections and common human experiences become visible, forming a Tapestry of human identity.

I tried to get the whole spectrum of human experience there, taking the…

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I’m making a frog

I've got the images all backward. BUT... perhaps you can see that under all the figerglass, is a frog. And inside that latex mold... is a frog! He looks like I put him on a wedding cake. Why am I making a frog? It may become a piece of desert art! Have a look here:

Earning the title of “Venus”

Anne Savage 07/10/2020  “There is in me something that is often stronger than my body, which is often enlivened by it.  In some people the inner spark scarcely exists.  I find it dominant in me.  Without it, I should die, but it will consume me (doubtless I speak of imagination, which masters and leads me.)” ... Continue Reading →

Day at the Museum: Field Trips for Kids and Museum Educators

I’ve asked my kids what they remember about visiting art museums. Mostly it was impressions of the reverence they had to have for the institution. Then there were natural history museums – it the impressive scale of ancient things and as for children’s museums, they remember the fun they were able to have interacting – huge chess sets, wind tunnels, water and manipulative objects.
Wouldn’t it be great to mix it all up?
My thoughts tend to drift toward how museums educators can make everything more inclusive for special needs children. My experience is with bringing art into the classroom and teaching about the masters at the primary education level – the best times were had with children who had special needs. Specifically developmental or cognitive disorders. These are children who are often being taught to assimilate instead of meet the world on their terms – it was thrilling to let them find that expression through art was something they could make their own.

Thank you Lindsey for this great post.

Looking Back, Moving Forward in Museum Education!

Added to Medium, July 27, 2017

Before we know it, it will be time for kids to return to school. The highlight of the majority of the students’ school year is the field trip or two. Both kids and museum educators look forward to these field trips for different reasons. Kids enjoy time away from the classroom to play and to, ultimately, learn. Museum educators look forward to interacting with the students to show them ways to bring the material they learn to life, and to assist teachers in teaching the material the students learn in the classroom. To successfully fulfil our institutions’ missions as well as our schools’ expectations, we learn about what the teachers’ standards are for in the classroom they make sure to follow to help their students fulfil the requirements. By seeing how field trips effect kids and museum educators, we can understand how field trips…

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I’m a published author!!

I'm so happy with the research that came together for this post. The project will eventually yield an exhibition at the Lied Library on UNLV campus. I'll for sure post when it happens. Delayed Star-Rays: Photography and Intimacy in Times of Distance

Cakes

I like to make cakes. Once I find the pictures of all the Cub Scout and Birthday cakes... I'll post them.  

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Boom California

We aim to create a lively conversation about the vital social, cultural, and political issues of our times, in California and the world beyond.

Looking Back, Moving Forward in Museum Education!

Learn from the past, and preserve the future of education in and out of the museum.

Cracking the Collections

SPNHC Emerging Professionals Group

Art 261: Survey in Art History II

Early Renaissance to Post WWII Modernism

Class Blog for Art 260 Summer Session II 2020

Art Historian and Curator of the College of Fine Arts, UNLV

Julia in the Raw

savoring life one bite at a time